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I recently created a Facebook group called Quiverfull Sorority of Survivors (QFSOS) with the help of two others and while it is a secret group for members’ privacy, we don’t want the existence of it to be secret, so if you are a young woman who grew up in a Quiverfull or Christian patriarchy type home and want to join, just let me know by emailing me at becomingworldly (at) gmail (dot) com. It is a confidential and vetted group, with almost 70 members so far, and if you want to join, I or one of the other two girls running it will need to ask you a few questions first. It is an open and friendly group though, with people who have a range of beliefs, lifestyles, and views today. Also, if you aren’t sure if you would “qualify” to be a member (I’ve had several people ask me this question, particularly since most of our parents rejected such labels and just called themselves “bible believing Christians”), if you were homeschooled or sent to a small Christian school that used books from Abeka or ACE, or Bob Jones University Press, raised in a home where your parents practiced male headship and wifely submission, and you were taught that women were to be “the keepers of the home,” there’s a good chance you’d fit in well with the group.

Also, as part of celebrating the launch of the QFSOS group, the goal of which is to provide support and connection for women raised in Quiverfull and Christian Patriarchy environments, I will be hosting a guest blog series about the experiences of “sister-Moms” in Quiverfull families. This will actually be the first time I’ve had people do guest posts on Becoming Worldly and I’m excited about it and really can’t think of a better topic to start with! If you want to have a post of yours included in the series, email me.

So, before beginning with the first guest post, an account by a young woman who’s going by “DoaHF,” I figured a brief intro about the kinds of issues young women and girls who were raised in these sorts of environments often face would be appropriate. This intro is a generalization, but based on my experiences, research, reading blogs, and conversations with many other Quiverfull/Christian patriarchy daughters, the following troubling patterns and issues for girls emerge:

- Being a “parental child” and having an adult level of responsibility within the home starting at a young age.

- Inappropriate and enmeshed relationships with parents, particularly fathers, encouraged by daughter-to-father purity pledges, purity balls, and purity rings and teachings saying that daughters are under their father’s “spiritual covering,” much like a junior wife of sorts, until (and if) they receive permission to marry through a parent-guided or arranged process.

- Lack of age-appropriate financial, social, emotional, physical, or educational independence during formative years (and often into adulthood).

- Social isolation and indoctrination as part of a controlled, restricted, and separatist “us v. the ungodly world” perspective.

In May I briefly spoke out about my personal experiences as part of a BBC World Radio Heart & Soul documentary on the Quiverfull movement. The “A Womb Is A Weapon” radio piece is half an hour long, with some adorable British accents and one distinctive New Zealand one. I speak starting at minute 11, and Nancy Campbell totally sounds like a racist Disney villain. Yep…not even kidding!

Within this sort of isolated, dogmatic, and restricted environment where the parents are consumed by what they see as duty to “the Father,” the eldest daughters of Quiverfull families are enlisted as junior mothers to their own siblings. While Quiverfull proponents such as Nancy Campbell often talk about how helpful this system is to mothers of large families and focus on how much these daughters are learning about childcare, the drawbacks of the lifestyle to the daughters doing this constant care are numerous and are only recently coming to light because, as these daughters ourselves, we speaking are out about them. That is the focus of this “Voices of Sister-Moms” guest post series.

Note: The rest of these issues apply to daughters of Christian patriarchy as well as Quiverfull daughters, because while many in Christian patriarchy families did not have to care for numerous siblings, most still had the rest of the accompanying teachings, rules, and expectations.

The “Dad in charge of everything, particularly guarding his daughter from the interest of young men” is a standard thing in Christian patriarchy (with a watered-down and often more symbolic version of this occurring in mainstream society) but it can become much more extreme when a daughter is homeschooled. Then she literally can be hidden away from all outside men and boys, encouraged to look to Daddy as the manliest of manly examples in her life, and I don’t think I have to get into how very wrong this can sometimes go. Daughters who do eventually disobey or disagree with their fathers (often by choosing higher education without approval or planning to marry someone he disapproves of) describe a subsequent shunning that takes place by dear old Dad as being “like a bad breakup.” This, folks, can be referred to by the icky name for what it actually is – emotional incest.

Some young women report not being allowed to work outside the home in their teens and early 20′s, others report being able to do so under heavy monitoring and sometimes then only at certain types of workplaces seen as appropriately “feminine” or gender-segregated enough, and others report being able to only work in or start home-based businesses or do tutoring and childcare. Some report engaging in long hours of unpaid labor for family businesses, others being forced to turn over their earnings to their parents, and others having what they are allowed to spend their savings on tightly controlled by their parents. Either way, becoming physically and financially independent is often not allowed.

A number of Quiverfull/Christian patriarchy daughters say that they were not permitted to get their diploma, a GED, or their drivers license (and some even did not have social security numbers issued to them due to being the product of an unreported home birth) because their parents chose to use withholding these things as a way to control them. Some have even said that they were told it would be their future husband’s choice as to whether they eventually got these things, or were simply told that they would not need them for a life of housewifery and motherhood. Obviously for many, a college education is intentionally set out of reach, whether being described as an unbecoming or immoral goal for daughters, the young woman being repeatedly told she is not intelligent enough or doesn’t have the right aptitudes to obtain higher education, or through her parents refusing to sign FAFSA paperwork enabling her to be eligible for student financial aid.

Many girls report only being able to socialize with siblings or the daughters of likeminded families, and then only under supervision, steeped in a strong “informant culture” inculcated into the children that generally curtails secret-telling. In addition to often being kept away from peers, most girls report being encouraged or required to wear “modest” dresses that are several sizes too big or more appropriate for someone several years younger or a great deal older, having their Internet and phone conversations closely monitored, and having friendships with boys disallowed or ended for superficial reasons.

Another thing often mentioned by young women who grew up in Quiverfull and Christian patriarchy homes is that very coercive and often both emotionally and physically abusive “discipline methods” were regularly used on them to keep them toeing the parental line. “Spankings” that consist of multiple hard hits with a belt, a piece of plumbing line, or a wooden stick or utensil (sometimes occurring well into their teenage years), “taking of privileges” that may include meals or basic necessities, and being put “on restriction” by being given punishing chores and/or temporarily shunned and shamed by the family for any form of questioning or disobeying. Often there are threats of having even minimal contact with the outside world removed and replaced with punishments if a girl gives so much as a hint of showing disagreement or displeasure towards her parents, which is referred to as “having a bad attitude.” As such, smiling and “being joyful” are often the only moods permitted for young women like us and the struggles with depression, guilt, self-harm, and self-esteem that might be expected in such an emotionally repressive environment occur with regularity. In addition, and this is often reported to be one of the most painful of the control techniques, young women raised in Quiverfull/Christian patriarchy families often are told that they are risking their very souls, God’s wrath, and the entrance of demonic and satanic forces into their lives if they do not “honor their mother and father” by cheerfully complying with every parental request. Some parents will also tell their children that the bible permits and may even require rebellious offspring to be put to death.

For most young women who do choose to leave (or are forced to leave) the Quiverfull/Christian patriarchy way of life, the outside world can be quite overwhelming and scary in many ways and the transition difficult on many levels. Some initially find shelter in marriage and family, others though university attendance, others through paid employment, and still others through the help of extended family and friends. A few even manage to find their way to places like Meadowhaven for cult deprogramming.

As we come of age and grow in our understanding of what happened to us, gather to tell our stories, there is a sense of comfort, healing, and solidarity in finally being able to compare and share our experiences, to know that we are not broken, we did not “imagine things,” and we are not alone. Together we can face the truth and recognize (if not come to an in-depth understanding of something seemingly so unfathomable) that the indoctrination that took place in our formative years was indeed done by the same people who brought us into this world and our parents were likely indoctrinated themselves.

While growing up in this lifestyle may seem pretty extreme or foreign to someone looking at it from the outside (or even to someone like me who grew up in it but didn’t really see it through this sort of framework until many years later) there is something important to keep in mind. First, it was normal for us because it was what we knew. Also, although it certainly can bring hardship and pain – after all we never asked or chose to be raised in such an environment – there are many strong, smart, dedicated, and likable young women who have escaped it and “pass for normal” in our society today. I have so much respect for many of the ones I’ve had the honor of meeting and getting to know and look forward to being introduced to more.

When you choose to move on despite the fear, the hardships, the shouted threats by “leaders” and patriarchs, even while knowing you may face a loss of connection with your own family, you do it because something inside you says you have to be free to live, not because you want to leave your loved ones behind. Despite the unnecessary hardships that many of us have had to overcome (and are still overcoming), today we know that we have both the right and the ability to let ourselves out of the cage that this harsh and harmful lifestyle is, and as more of us come of age, more will continue to do so and we hope to make it easier for them. The Quiverfull/Christian patriarchy movement is still young so it’s mostly the “big sisters” who are speaking out right now but as time goes on our little sisters will likely join us.

So while these sorts of formative experiences do leave scars, today those of us who are out can choose what directions we would like our lives to go, take back these stolen parts of our lives, and as we let others know what happened and how we felt about it, we can find assurance in the knowledge that while we are discovering and shedding light on a dark side of human nature, we are also highlighting the resilience of the human spirit and the power of community.

We might have each felt hopelessly alone and silenced while we went through this stuff before, as children, teens, and young women, but we are not alone today and we now have the words and confidence to share what happened to us, what is still happening to others, and the confidence to ask you to understand and help us do something about it.

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8 thoughts on “Quiverfull Sorority of Survivors (QFSOS) & Voices of “Sister-Moms”

  1. Pingback: New Facebook page for Quiverfull Survivors | A Quiver Full of Information

  2. emotional incest, parentification, patriarchy. yep. been there. done that. No thanks for anymore of “Jehovah’s loving arrangements,” like shunning, spanking, disfellowshipping, public reproof. BARF. Thank godlessness that I am worldly and atheist and educated and out of the cult! I am not a young woman, so I don’t qualify to join the group, but if any one wants to chat about ways of getting out that might be better than the way I did it, please feel free to contact me.

  3. is there anything a man not raised in those conditions (and not financially independent) but worried by the existence of such indoctrination do to help you? (although I must admit there are an uncanny similiarity to some experiences I have had, sometimes gender-flipped, sometimes not, but from what I read I am betting any similiarity is coincidental tip-of-the-iceberg issue).

  4. Pingback: Quiverfull Sorority of Survivors (QFSOS) & Voices of “Sister-Moms”

  5. This seems like a very interesting series. I can definitely relate to some of it. As a woman, I wonder where are all the male voices. What was it like to grow up in a QF home as a boy?

    What things are men trying to de-program themselves of? There are a lot of women writing about their QF past, but I haven’t seen any men. I would would be curious to hear how men are trying to change their parenting and relational styles.

    • There are a lot less men speaking out but there are some. I too am interested to hear what more men’s stories are. I think in the hyper masculine culture they were raised with its often hard for them to be open about it and they rarely feel “manly enough” as it is, and many often struggle with talking to the opposite sex and are prone to using substances to overcome social anxiety or self-medicate depression or PTSD. So I think it’s not that the women were the only ones with problems from this environment, more that its more culturally accepted for women to form friendships by sharing hardships and secrets. Hopefully as we build it will be done in a way that men can feel comfortable sharing their stories too. Over at Homeschoolers Anonymous I think that has started to happen.

  6. Pingback: Voices of Sister-Moms: Part One, Introduction | H . A

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